Walden Essay Thesis

Walden Essay Thesis-37
In July 1941, the Thoreau Society of America was founded at a meeting in Concord.Still active today, the Thoreau Society's purpose is "to honor Henry David Thoreau, by stimulating interest in and fostering education about his life, works, and philosophy and his place in his world and ours, by coordinating research on his life and writings, and by acting as a repository for Thoreauviana and material relevant to Henry David Thoreau, and by advocating for the preservation of Thoreau Country." Thoreau's popularity continued: six editions of Walden were published in 1948, eleven in 1958, and twenty-three in 1968, along with many editions of his other works.

In July 1941, the Thoreau Society of America was founded at a meeting in Concord.

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Thoreau's life and work have continued to provoke and inspire, and there are almost as many different opinions as there are readers. (Walden, 90) He also went to the pond to work on a book that was to be a memorial tribute to his older brother John, who had died three years earlier of lockjaw.

Which view of Thoreau is most accurate: The dour hermit of Walden Woods? The narrative frame of the story is provided by a boat trip the brothers had taken in 1839, but there are many philosophical digressions. He began collecting material to write lectures for his curious townsmen, and he delivered two at the Concord Lyceum, on February 10 and 17, 1847.

Unlike Thoreau's first book, Walden enjoyed moderate success from the first, and it continued to sell reasonably well after Thoreau's death in 1862.

But in the 1870s and 1880s, critics attacked Thoreau's character and style of life, accusing him of crankiness and irresponsibility.

Although Walden enjoyed only moderate success in Thoreau's lifetime, his experiment at the pond would spark considerable interest in the years to come. None suffices to represent Thoreau by itself; all find support in Walden.

The book has inspired other young people to follow his example and retire to a lonely spot--even if only in imagination--to ponder the world and their place in it. In late March 1845 Thoreau went to Walden Pond, a sixty-two acre body of water a few miles from his parents' home in Concord, Massachusetts, and selected a spot to build a house.When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. (Walden, 3) With these words, Henry David Thoreau began the tale of his experiment of simple living at Walden Pond.Over the course of the next three hundred-odd pages, Thoreau outlined his philosophy of life, politics, and nature, laying the foundation for a secure place in the canon of great American writers.These plans were brought to the attention of Don Henley, lead singer of the rock group the Eagles, by a group of concerned local residents.Henley spearheaded a campaign to preserve the area, and rallied political figures such as Senators Ted Kennedy and Paul Tsongas, as well as a number of actors and musicians, to the support of the Walden Woods Project (WWP).The cairn became a standard stop for pilgrims to Walden.In the 1940s, the exact site of Thoreau's house was located and excavated by Roland Robbins, and simple granite posts were placed to indicate the outline of the structure.The proper use of Walden Pond and Walden Woods has been the subject of debate for over a century. For several decades, the area has been open to the public for swimming and fishing.Should it serve as a public park with full access for swimming, fishing, hunting, and camping? Those who have felt that the pond was threatened by overuse have been very vocal in Concord, and during the 1980s the number of users per day was limited by closing the parking area when a certain capacity was reached.He entertained visitors and made regular trips to town; friends and neighbors began to inquire about his life at the pond. A Week was not well received by the public, however, and only two hundred copies of it sold in the first few years after its publication. When publisher James Munroe returned the unsold copies to him in 1853, Thoreau wrote in a journal entry for October 28, 1853, "I have now a library of nearly 900 volumes over 700 of which I wrote myself--" Considering the failure of A Week, publishers were not enthusiastic about Walden, and plans for its publication were postponed.Over the next five years, through seven drafts, Walden evolved from a sometime shrill justification of Thoreau's unorthodox lifestyle into a complex, multi-layered account of a spiritual journey. Two thousand copies were printed, selling for

The book has inspired other young people to follow his example and retire to a lonely spot--even if only in imagination--to ponder the world and their place in it. In late March 1845 Thoreau went to Walden Pond, a sixty-two acre body of water a few miles from his parents' home in Concord, Massachusetts, and selected a spot to build a house.

When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. (Walden, 3) With these words, Henry David Thoreau began the tale of his experiment of simple living at Walden Pond.

Over the course of the next three hundred-odd pages, Thoreau outlined his philosophy of life, politics, and nature, laying the foundation for a secure place in the canon of great American writers.

These plans were brought to the attention of Don Henley, lead singer of the rock group the Eagles, by a group of concerned local residents.

Henley spearheaded a campaign to preserve the area, and rallied political figures such as Senators Ted Kennedy and Paul Tsongas, as well as a number of actors and musicians, to the support of the Walden Woods Project (WWP).

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The book has inspired other young people to follow his example and retire to a lonely spot--even if only in imagination--to ponder the world and their place in it. In late March 1845 Thoreau went to Walden Pond, a sixty-two acre body of water a few miles from his parents' home in Concord, Massachusetts, and selected a spot to build a house.When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. (Walden, 3) With these words, Henry David Thoreau began the tale of his experiment of simple living at Walden Pond.Over the course of the next three hundred-odd pages, Thoreau outlined his philosophy of life, politics, and nature, laying the foundation for a secure place in the canon of great American writers.These plans were brought to the attention of Don Henley, lead singer of the rock group the Eagles, by a group of concerned local residents.Henley spearheaded a campaign to preserve the area, and rallied political figures such as Senators Ted Kennedy and Paul Tsongas, as well as a number of actors and musicians, to the support of the Walden Woods Project (WWP).The cairn became a standard stop for pilgrims to Walden.In the 1940s, the exact site of Thoreau's house was located and excavated by Roland Robbins, and simple granite posts were placed to indicate the outline of the structure.The proper use of Walden Pond and Walden Woods has been the subject of debate for over a century. For several decades, the area has been open to the public for swimming and fishing.Should it serve as a public park with full access for swimming, fishing, hunting, and camping? Those who have felt that the pond was threatened by overuse have been very vocal in Concord, and during the 1980s the number of users per day was limited by closing the parking area when a certain capacity was reached.He entertained visitors and made regular trips to town; friends and neighbors began to inquire about his life at the pond. A Week was not well received by the public, however, and only two hundred copies of it sold in the first few years after its publication. When publisher James Munroe returned the unsold copies to him in 1853, Thoreau wrote in a journal entry for October 28, 1853, "I have now a library of nearly 900 volumes over 700 of which I wrote myself--" Considering the failure of A Week, publishers were not enthusiastic about Walden, and plans for its publication were postponed.Over the next five years, through seven drafts, Walden evolved from a sometime shrill justification of Thoreau's unorthodox lifestyle into a complex, multi-layered account of a spiritual journey. Two thousand copies were printed, selling for $1 each.

each.

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