Teenage Pregnancy Research Paper

Teenage Pregnancy Research Paper-57
Results from cumulative years of the National Demographic and Health Survey and the latest result of the 2011 Family Health Survey, shows that teenage pregnancy in the Philippines, measured as the proportion of women who have begun childbearing in their teen years, has been steadily rising over a 35-year period.These teenage mothers are predominantly poor, reside in rural areas and have low educational attainment.

Results from cumulative years of the National Demographic and Health Survey and the latest result of the 2011 Family Health Survey, shows that teenage pregnancy in the Philippines, measured as the proportion of women who have begun childbearing in their teen years, has been steadily rising over a 35-year period.These teenage mothers are predominantly poor, reside in rural areas and have low educational attainment.

The risks follow an age gradient; they are generally higher at the younger end of the teenage years and diminish toward the latter teen years.

Teenage pregnancy carries other significant non-health risks which are specific to this stage in the life course.

In most developing countries, majority of births occur in non-hospital settings.

To determine the level of teenage pregnancy in a given country, one potential data source is the Vital Registration System, which collects vital statistics such as births, death and marriages in the population.

This paper consists of two parts: the first discusses data sources for the study of teenage pregnancy in general; the second part presents trends in teenage pregnancy in the Philippines, some correlates and an analysis of the drivers for the observed trend using a specific data source.

We will use data from the National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) conducted in the Philippines at 5-year intervals since 1968.This is more often true in urban than in rural areas.Zabin and Kiragu (1998) in their review report a connection between age of onset of sexual activity or age at first birth and age at menarche resulting in earlier onset of childbearing for the current generation of teenagers compared with earlier cohorts.Women’s age-specific fertility rates[*] follow a characteristic pattern.Soon after menarche, the fertility rate starts at a low level, peaks at ages 20-29, then declines until it stops completely following menopause.For example, completed charts on births occurring in a hospital over a given period can be the source of information for studying pregnancy outcomes, as these will normally contain basic demographic information: the mother’s age, the pregnancy order as predictor variables and factors like maternal complications, placental complications, medications administered in hospital and neonatal outcomes as outcome indicators.The advantage of these data sets is that they provide reliable and valid reports on the pregnancy outcomes under study using medically accepted diagnostic criteria and are not based on the teenage mother’s self-report.Background variables on the mother that can serve as explanatory factors may also be limited; some will record education but socioeconomic status is normally not included in hospital records.As a data source for determining the total number of teenage pregnancies, hospital-based records are not reliable as these cover only hospital-based births.From a large data base of births in the Latin American Center for Perinatology and Human Development in Uruguay, it was found that after adjusting for major confounding factors, women age 15 and younger were at increased risk for maternal death, early neonatal death and anemia compared with women age 20-24.Furthermore, women aged less than 20 had higher risk for postpartum hemorrhage, puerperal endometritis, operative vaginal delivery, low birth weight, pre-term delivery and small for gestational age infants.

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