Dyslexia Research Papers

Dyslexia Research Papers-22
“What was surprising for me was the magnitude of the difference.These are not subtle differences,” says Perrachione.Neural adaptation has primed the brain to read the spots in a new way. James This new work partially solves the paradox because rapid neural adaptation is a “low-level” function of the brain, which acts as a building block for “higher-level,” abstract functions. “Why are there other domains that are so well done by people with reading difficulty?

“What was surprising for me was the magnitude of the difference.These are not subtle differences,” says Perrachione.Neural adaptation has primed the brain to read the spots in a new way. James This new work partially solves the paradox because rapid neural adaptation is a “low-level” function of the brain, which acts as a building block for “higher-level,” abstract functions. “Why are there other domains that are so well done by people with reading difficulty?

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Their experiments, published December 21, 2016, in the journal , are the first to use brain imaging to compare neural adaptation in the brains of people with dyslexia and those who read normally.“We found the signature everywhere we looked,” says Perrachione.The results suggest that dyslexic brains have to work harder than “typical” brains to process incoming sights and sounds, requiring additional mental overhead for even the simplest tasks.This optical illusion shows rapid neural adaptation in action. But look a little longer and you will see a Dalmatian.(The dog’s nose is in the center of the image and his body extends to the right.) After seeing the Dalmatian once, most people see it every time they view the picture, even if they don’t explicitly remember where to look.The colored regions show adaptation, or the change in brain activation upon hearing a voice for the first time, and hearing it repeatedly.The average of non-dyslexic brains shows stronger adaptation than the average of dyslexic brains.The research was supported by the Lawrence Ellison Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation.In the team’s first experiment, volunteers without dyslexia were asked to pair spoken words with images on a screen while the researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (f MRI) to track their brain activity. In one version, they listened to words spoken by a variety of different voices.But during the first test, the brain continued revving with each new word and voice.When the voice stayed the same in the second test, the brain did not have to work as hard. These f MRI images show how people with dyslexia (right) and people without (left) adapt differently to a speaker’s voice.

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